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3P - English 3 Academic/Honors-Period 3: 9:30 – 10:45

Course Description

This is a combined Academic & Honors level class.

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Brassard Remediation Week: June 7 – June 11

If you are missing summative assessments from semester 1 or semester 2, there is still time to turn them in for credit. Remediation ends Friday, June 11. 

Completing and submitting missing summative assessments will improve your semester grades, increasing your yearly grade. All summative assessments are posted on our Google Classroom. You may also complete formative assessments from semester 2 – do not submit formatives from semester 1.

Teacher Assistance: June 7 - 10, Monday - Thursday, 7 am - 3 pm. Please email me to schedule a virtual meeting. 
 
Brassard Office Hours
Friday, June 11: 8:00 - 10:00 am
Video call link: https://meet.google.com/qpp-nidq-ttp

Options if you fail English: Summer school or Retake the class next year

Brassard Week of May 3 - May 7

ODD Classes April 5 – May 7

Course:  P1 Remote English 1 & 2

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How does the structure of a text impact a reader’s understanding? What are the components of the five basic structures of text? 

Learning TargetsReading

  • I can annotate a text as I read to keep track of ideas and quotes that are essential to my analysis.
  • I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important.
  • I can explain how the main claim develops over time using specific details.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Analyzing the structure of nonfiction

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Summative Unit Assessment Thursday, May 7

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 7, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Summative Unit Assessment Thursday, May 7

 

Brassard Week of April 26 - 30

ODD Classes April 5 – May 7

Course:  P1 Remote English 1 & 2

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How does the structure of a text impact a reader’s understanding? What are the components of the five basic structures of text? What are the parts of speech and does one use them correctly?

Learning TargetsReading

  • I can annotate a text as I read to keep track of ideas and quotes that are essential to my analysis.
  • I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important.
  • I can explain how the main claim develops over time using specific details.

Learning TargetsLanguage Usage:

  • I can identify the parts of a sentence and understand their function to correctly write in complete sentences.
  • I can identify the parts of speech of words and use them correctly in my writing.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Analyzing the structure of nonfiction

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Reading Interpretation

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 7, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Reading Interpretation

 

Brassard Week of April 12 - 16

EVEN Classes April 5 – May 7

Vacation: April 16 – 23

Course:  P1 Remote English 1 & 2

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How does the structure of a text impact a reader’s understanding? What are the components of the five basic structures of text? What are the parts of speech and does one use them correctly?

Learning TargetsReading

  • I can annotate a text as I read to keep track of ideas and quotes that are essential to my analysis.
  • I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important.
  • I can explain how the main claim develops over time using specific details.

Learning TargetsLanguage Usage:

  • I can identify the parts of a sentence and understand their function to correctly write in complete sentences.
  • I can identify the parts of speech of words and use them correctly in my writing.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Parts-of-Speech quiz - summative

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Class notes; Summative – Reading Interpretation

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 7, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Class notes; Summative – Reading Interpretation

 

Brassard Week of April 5 - 9

EVEN Classes April 5 – May 7

Vacation: April 19 – 23

Course:  P1 Remote English 1 & 2

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How does the structure of a text impact a reader’s understanding? What are the components of the five basic structures of text? What are the parts of speech and does one use them correctly?

Learning TargetsReading

  • I can annotate a text as I read to keep track of ideas and quotes that are essential to my analysis.
  • I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important.
  • I can explain how the main claim develops over time using specific details.

Learning TargetsLanguage Usage:

  • I can identify the parts of a sentence and understand their function to correctly write in complete sentences.
  • I can identify the parts of speech of words and use them correctly in my writing.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Introduction to the unit; Class notes

Course:  P3 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Introduction to the unit; Class notes

Course:  P7 Remote English 3 (Junior English)

Course Schedule: Period 7, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 Link posted on Google and class calendar

Essential Questions: How do different perspectives change our understanding of events? Whose stories get told in the “historical record”? How can we assess the accuracy of a “historically based” work of art, such as modern theatre and music?

Learning Targets – Reading

  • I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose.
  • I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator.
  • I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.
  • I can defend the structure of a text and how it impacts the author’s purpose/claim.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Introduction to the unit; Class notes

 

 
 

Brassard Week of March 1 – March 5

ODD Classes February 1 – March 5

Course:  P1 Remote English I & 2

Course Schedule: Period 4, 8:10 - 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Students will develop an understating of plot structure, theme, suspense, and foreshadowing through reading analysis of short stories.

Unit Essential Questions: What are the characteristics of a short story? What is justice? What is the relationship between courage and responsibility? How do experiences shape our personal identity? How does foreshadowing create suspense?

Unit Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can identify a theme or main claim and find examples to support that theme/claim.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will read a short story, analyzing the plot elements, interpreting an author’s use of suspense and foreshadowing

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Make literary connections between nonfiction and fiction.

Summative Assessments: Reading Analysis and Interpretation 

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Make literary connections between nonfiction and fiction.

Summative Assessments: Reading Analysis and Interpretation 

Brassard Week of Feb 22 to Feb 25

ODD Classes February 1 – March 5

Course:  P1 Remote English I & 2

Course Schedule: Period 4, 8:10 - 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Students will develop an understating of plot structure, theme, suspense, and foreshadowing through reading analysis of short stories.

Unit Essential Questions: What are the characteristics of a short story? What is justice? What is the relationship between courage and responsibility? How do experiences shape our personal identity? How does foreshadowing create suspense?

Unit Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can identify a theme or main claim and find examples to support that theme/claim.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will read a short story, analyzing the plot elements, interpreting an author’s use of suspense and foreshadowing

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Make literary connections between nonfiction and fiction.

Summative Assessments: None this week 

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Make literary connections between nonfiction and fiction.

Summative Assessments: None this week 

Brassard Week of Feb 8 - Feb 11

ODD Classes February 1 – March 5

Course:  P1 Remote English I & 2

Course Schedule: Period 4, 8:10 - 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:00 – 11:00 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Students will develop an understating of plot structure, theme, suspense, and foreshadowing through reading analysis of short stories.

Unit Essential Questions: What are the characteristics of a short story? What is justice? What is the relationship between courage and responsibility? How do experiences shape our personal identity? How does foreshadowing create suspense?

Unit Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can identify a theme or main claim and find examples to support that theme/claim.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will read a short story, analyzing the plot elements. Summative: Create an ending to the short story – applying knowledge of the plot elements.

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:00 – 11:00 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Make literary connections between the information presented in a documentary and the novel.

Summative Assessments: None this week 

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Make literary connections between the information presented in a documentary and the novel.

Summative Assessments: None this week 

Brassard Week of Feb 1 - Feb 4

ODD Classes February 1 – March 5

Course:  P1 Remote English I & 2

Course Schedule: Period 4, 8:10 - 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:00 – 11:00 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Students will develop an understating of plot structure, theme, suspense, and foreshadowing through reading analysis of short stories.

Unit Essential Questions: What are the characteristics of a short story? What is justice? What is the relationship between courage and responsibility? How do experiences shape our personal identity? How do foreshadowing create suspense?

Unit Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can identify a theme or main claim and find examples to support that theme/claim.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will be introduced to plot elements, submitting class notes as a formative assessment.

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:00 – 11:00 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Introduction to the unit; Interpretation of text

Summative Assessments: None this week

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 3, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Weekly Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Unit Goal: Through the reading of Tim O'Brien's novel The Things They Carried; students will gain an in-depth understanding of the way that personal experience drives the writing process. They will also examine the differences between fiction and nonfiction and determine where the two categories overlap and what effect this has on the reader in the context of O'Brien's novel.

Unit Essential Questions: What is the purpose of storytelling and the personal narrative? What effect do historical events have on literature? How does the personal narrative and storytelling help the writer/storyteller to cope with personal experience? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction writing? How does the use of figurative language help a writer convey meaning to his audience?

Unit Learning Targets

Reading: I can evaluate the author’s point of view and purpose. I can analyze an author’s treatment of point of view and consider the reliability of the narrator. I can make reasonable assertions about an author’s argument, considering accuracy, bias, validity, and credibility, by using elements of the text to defend and clarify my interpretations.

Writing: I can synthesize information gathered from a variety of sources. I can compare the presentation of similar themes and/or topics across texts, using textual evidence to support my analysis. I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis.

Class Meeting Link: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Formative Assessments: Introduction to the unit; Interpretation of text

Summative Assessments: None this week

 
 
 

Brassard Week of 12/21 – 12/22 ODD

ODD classes end this week. Any missing work should be completed before January 4.

 EVEN classes begin on January 4.

Course:  P1 Remote English I

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday - Thursday

No Office Hours this week

Essential Questions: What are the differences between Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairytales, and Fables? What are the characteristics of the traditional types of literature? What is a legend?

Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can describe cultural values inferred from the text.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Students will read and analyze a story that is an example of all types of traditional literature: Myth, Fairy Tale, Fable, Legend, and Tall Tall.

Summative Assessment: Analyzing Traditional Literature

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 4, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

No Office Hours this week

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts, and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis. I can demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Summative Assessment: Argumentative essay outline, due December 22.

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 8, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

No Office Hours this week

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I can develop a thesis based on my interpretation of background information and provided topics. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can use well-chosen, relevant facts, and quotations from a variety of sources to support my thesis. I can demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Summative Assessment: Argumentative essay outline, due December 22.

 
 

Brassard Week of 12/14 – 12/17 ODD

Course:  P1 Remote English I

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday - Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: What are the differences between Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairytales, and Fables? What are the characteristics of the traditional types of literature? What is a Tall Tale?

Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can describe cultural values inferred from the text.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Students will learn the basic elements of Legends. Students will interpret the structure and cultural relevance of Legends. Students will read and interpret the Legend of King Arthur. Students will be introduced to Tall Tales, and begin working on a summative assessment of traditional literature.

Formative: Interpreting Legends; Analyzing Traditional Literature

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 4, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Summative Assessment – begin working on an argumentative essay, due December 22.

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 8, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Summative Assessment – begin working on an argumentative essay, due December 22.

Brassard Week of 12/7 – 12/10 ODD

Course:  P1 Remote English 1

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday - Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: What are the differences between Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairytales, and Fables? What are the characteristics of the traditional types of literature? What is a legend?

Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can describe cultural values inferred from the text.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Students will learn the basic elements of Legends. Students will interpret the structure and cultural relevance of Legends. Students will read and interpret the Legend of King Arthur.

Formative: Interpreting Legends

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 4, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will read and discuss ideas presented in the various pieces of non-fiction literature, analyzing the effectiveness of the arguments presented.

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 8, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will read and discuss ideas presented in the various pieces of non-fiction literature, analyzing the effectiveness of the arguments presented.


 

 

Brassard Week of 11/30 – 12/3 ODD

Course:  P1 Remote English I

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday - Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: What are the differences between Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairytales, and Fables? What are the characteristics of the traditional types of literature?

Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can describe cultural values inferred from the text.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Students will learn the basic elements of Fables. Students will interpret the structure and cultural relevance of Fables.

Formative: Interpreting Fables

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 4, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will read and discuss ideas presented in the various pieces of non-fiction literature, analyzing the effectiveness of the arguments presented.   

 

No classes November 25 & 26 – Thanksgiving Break

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 8, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness? What role does failure play in obtaining the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will read and discuss ideas presented in the various pieces of non-fiction literature, analyzing the effectiveness of the arguments presented.   

Brassard Week of 11/23 – 11/24 ODD

No classes November 25 & 26 – Thanksgiving Break

Course:  P1 Remote English 1`

Course Schedule: Period 1, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday - Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: What are the differences between Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairytales, and Fables? What are the characteristics of the traditional types of literature?

Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can describe cultural values inferred from the text.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Students will learn the basic elements and differences of Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairy Tales, and Fables. Students will interpret the structure and cultural relevance of Fairy Tales.

Formative: Interpreting Fairy Tales

 

No classes November 25 & 26 – Thanksgiving Break

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 4, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

No Office Hours Friday, November 27

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will view and discuss the ideas presented in the documentary Happy! Students will complete several formative assessments based on their understanding of the material presented.

Summative: Interpretation and application of common themes presented in various media  

 

No classes November 25 & 26 – Thanksgiving Break

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 8, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

No Office Hours Friday, November 27

Essential Questions: Is there a common definition of the American Dream? What is your definition of the American Dream? Is achieving success and happiness part of the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will view and discuss the ideas presented in the documentary Happy! Students will complete several formative assessments based on their understanding of the material presented.

Summative: Interpretation and application of common themes presented in various media 

 
 

Brassard 11/16 – 11/19 ODD Classes

Course:  P1 Remote English 1

Course Schedule: Period 2, 8:10 – 9:25, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: What are the differences between Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairy Tales, and Fables? What are the characteristics of the traditional types of literature?

Learning Targets: I can identify a key scene or character in a text and explain why it is important. I can identify the plot structure of a text and explain why it is important. I can describe cultural values inferred from the text.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments for the week: Students will learn the basic elements and differences of Myths, Legends, Tall Tales, Fairy Tales, and Fables. Students will interpret the structure and cultural relevance of Fairy Tales.

Thursday, 11/19: Summative Assessment: Interpreting Fairy Tales

 

Course:  P3 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 4, 9:30 – 10:45, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a cultural definition of the American Dream? How do you define the American Dream? Is success and happiness important elements of the American Dream? How do you define success and happiness?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will view and discuss the ideas presented in the documentary Happy!, and complete several formative assessments based on their understanding of the material presented.

 

Course:  P7 Remote English 3

Course Schedule: Period 8, 12:35 – 1:50, Monday – Thursday

Office Hours: Friday, 9:30 – 11:30 (Link posted on Google Classroom)

Essential Questions: Is there a common definition of the American Dream? What is your definition of the American Dream? Is achieving success and happiness part of the American Dream?

Learning Targets: I understand the difference between active and passive voice and avoid passive voice in academic writing. I can introduce the evidence needed to support my claim and any counterclaims. I can write in a formal style with literary present tense, appropriate pronouns, active voice, and no contractions. I can write a conclusion that reinforces and strengthens my reasoning and connects my thesis to broader ideas. I can use the most effective words possible to make my writing more understandable and academic.

Class meeting: Please see our Google Classroom or your Google Calendar for the link

Student Assignments: Students will view and discuss the ideas presented in the documentary Happy!, and complete several formative assessments based on their understanding of the material presented.